Why wear a haramaki?

Black NukuNuku Haramaki worn to keep muscles warm
Photo Credit @polelux

Sceptical and think you don’t need one? You may be if you haven’t yet tried them (but you will be hooked when you do!) You can test it out by tying a scarf round your waist to try the effect. Soon you will see that having the core of your body insulated raises your body temperature all over. This is because the inner organs are warm, increasing your circulation, which spreads heat all over your body, even to the toes and fingers:

Gardener Emma in a grey haramaki

Vascular surgeon Eddie Chaloner (in the Daily Mail).’When the limbs are exposed to colder temperatures than the torso, blood vessels in the arms and legs constrict. Blood then bypasses the limbs and floods to the torso. Being wrapped around the stomach will help the body to maintain its core temperature so that it doesn’t lose heat.’

Christine wears her pink haramaki as an accessory

So basically, warm your core to warm you all over. You can wear them over or under your clothes and you need a snug fit.

Our Haramaki will help you maintain an overall warmer body temperature and so suit anyone who needs extra warmth – those who work or play outdoors in all seasons from gardeners to sea swimmers, those who need to keep warm and stretchy such as pole dancers, aerial athletes, yoga practitioners etc. They are great for health problems such as period pain, back ache, chronic fatigue, Raynauds etc etc.

With and Without Haramaki Thermal Image

PS. Two recent comments on one of our Facebook Ads suggest that a vest would have exactly the same effect (thanks ladies!). Are they are better than a vest? Yes! Here is why – because they don’t show through your clothes (unless you want them to), they don’t ride up like vests can, they extend down to cover more of you where you want it and you don’t feel like you are wearing too many layers. And key point (especially for those of us women in the merry perimenopause) is that you take them off easily when you get too hat and without stripping right down! Vests are great, haramaki are even better 🙂

Great for cyclists

Tips for warming up after sea swimming

“After drop” is common after swimming in cold water; you get out and feel fine, and then you start to get colder, sometimes growing faint, shivering violently and feeling unwell.” (Outdoor Swimming Society) 

Learning to head off the after drop is a key part of continuing to swim in cold water all year round. While in the cold water you can be lured into a false sense of security (numbness!) and stay in what turns out to be too long. With practice you learn your limitations (trial and error!)  just how cold you are going to be about 10 minutes after getting out. You then learn to moderate your swim times and get out before you feel you have to. Then the key is warming up – slowly. If you have a hot shower for example the blood can run from your core (where it is working hard to maintain your core temperature and keep you alive!) to your skin and actually make your temperature drop along with your blood pressure – potentially making you feel faint and ‘stinging’ your skin.

As you start to warm up blood starts to recirculate in your extremities and peripheral blood vessels, cooling as it travels. You can lose up to 4.5°C from your core temperature. This is where you haramaki corewarmer comes in really really handy.

swimmers in haramaki

Tips to warm up after you get out of cold water: 

  • Get dressed as soon as you can. Preferably starting with the top half of your body.  Use a haramaki. Use a robe to get dressed quicker and keep out of the wind.
  • Put on a hat and gloves and have some tea from a flask you brought with you!
  • Put on lots of layers. Haramaki, gloves, hat, thermals.
  • Sip a warm drink: this helps warm the body gently from the inside.
  • Eat something: sugar will help raise body temperature so have some cake!
  • Sit in a warm environment: chance for more tea and more cake with your fellow swimmers….
  • Walk around to generate body heat. It can take some time to warm properly. Running up and down the beach while waiting for your friends-who-faff can help.

For more information about acclimatising to cold water, the benefits and the risks go to the Outdoor Swimming Society 

If you have any good tips please add in the comments 🙂

Autumn is here – wrap your core

The temperature has dropped. You still want to get outside in the sunshine and enjoy being outside. Or you are reluctant to put on the heating and are getting cold sitting at your desk. Put on a haramaki – stretchy cotton ‘belly-wrap’ and keep yourself warm from your core to your extremities. The extra layer round your middle will help keep your whole body warmer. It keeps you snug and warm where you need it most. Like a scarf for your middle….

haramaki joy jump
Keeping Beach Bums Warm