Seabirds sea swimmers

At NukuNuku we are very happy to know that our Haramakis support people who work and play outside as they allow you to stay outside longer by keeping them warmer for longer.

A great example is the growing wild swimming community. Seabirds Ltd sell NukuNuku Haramakis and their sea swimming community benefits from having discovered our core-warmers for warming up post-sea swim. Here is a post from one of the Seabirds explaining why she loves Sea Swimming and how to start it up:

Sea swimming has become part of my regular routine now. It gives me equilibrium. It never fails to shift a black mood. I am outside in all weathers, enjoying life and feeling alive. Swimming with the Salty Seabirds has brought fun and laughter into my life on a daily basis. Having FUN and JOY as a routine part of my daily life is SO MUCH BETTER THAN BEFORE. This has made me realise how previously days/weeks/months could go by before where life was mainly job and duty, no scheduled FUN, much less laughter and playfulness. I have re-discovered my inner child doing handstands in the cold water and found my tribe having a laugh about forgetting my pants again with other Salties drinking tea on the beach.  This is why we started Seabirds Ltd and then the Salty Seabirds. To share the swim love and enlarge the group of like minded folk who relish dicking about in the sea in all weathers! We all deserve fun and laughter and to play – it is the antidote to many, many things I have found.

So if you want to start, how does the Salty Seabird Swim Community work? Firstly it is SELF SERVICE so if you need a swim set up every Wednesday at 3pm for example – you can set one up. Our current regular swims are: Mondays 10:45, Fridays 13:30 and Saturday 9:45 (all Hove Lawns/Dolphin 5) were all set up to fit with our work/life routines.  Regular swims are in the events section on the facebook page. So are event swims like the monthly full moon swims.

So there are the regular swims, and then the daily random/spontaneous swims posted in the group. This of course takes a bit more Facebook hovering. Anyone can post and if it is posted in the group any member is welcome and can turn up. Unless stated otherwise (ie the rare ‘who will come around the West Pier with me type invitations’) dipping and messing about, head out breaststroke or head down crawl swimming round the buoys all welcome. I for one am a parallel breaststroker and happy with that. You don’t need to be a confident or ‘strong’ swimmer to stay in the shallows and swim parallel to the shore. No wetsuit or wetsuit on. Whatever suits you best. No judgement, all welcome. The experienced Salties are all very friendly and kind, you will be welcomed and glad you came along.

Keeping warm on snow days – cozy in a haramaki back warmer

Do you have a snow day today? The key to getting outdoors is the right gear. We even managed a sea swim (6 degrees) with the help of our hats, haramakis and thermals.

Cozy with a fire, tea and a haramaki (with a hot water bottle shoved down the back) we can crack on and go through finances, stock take and planning for the future. With a little help from Gary 😉

Photo credit Ruthie Delfruity

Keep your Kidneys warm in an Angora Haramaki

Introducing the ultra-warm Angora Haramaki in grey and black. Made in the EU from ethically sourced Angora. Snug and stretchy. 

Angora wool is a very soft and luxurious fibre.  The fibres are hollow, making angora a fantastic natural insulator. It is one of the warmest natural fibres you can get – up to seven times warmer than sheep’s wool – making it ideal for use in thermal underwear and in our haramaki! As it is so warm, and has a natural cushion it has beneficial therapeutic effects for back problems, Arthritis, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome or any other pain affecting your joints.  It is, however, a little more expensive than other fibres. These Angora rabbits are not harmed for their wool, but are sheared regularly and their welfare checked by Orkney Angora’s William Sichel.

Our Ultra-Warm Haramaki are truly fantastic for keeping your core warm. We use them after a regular dip in the English Channel!

 

 

Tips for warming up after sea swimming

“After drop” is common after swimming in cold water; you get out and feel fine, and then you start to get colder, sometimes growing faint, shivering violently and feeling unwell.” (Outdoor Swimming Society) 

Learning to head off the after drop is a key part of continuing to swim in cold water all year round. While in the cold water you can be lured into a false sense of security (numbness!) and stay in what turns out to be too long. With practice you learn your limitations (trial and error!)  just how cold you are going to be about 10 minutes after getting out. You then learn to moderate your swim times and get out before you feel you have to. Then the key is warming up – slowly. If you have a hot shower for example the blood can run from your core (where it is working hard to maintain your core temperature and keep you alive!) to your skin and actually make your temperature drop along with your blood pressure – potentially making you feel faint and ‘stinging’ your skin.

As you start to warm up blood starts to recirculate in your extremities and peripheral blood vessels, cooling as it travels. You can lose up to 4.5°C from your core temperature. This is where you haramaki corewarmer comes in really really handy.

swimmers in haramaki

Tips to warm up after you get out of cold water: 

  • Get dressed as soon as you can. Preferably starting with the top half of your body.  Use a haramaki. Use a robe to get dressed quicker and keep out of the wind.
  • Put on a hat and gloves and have some tea from a flask you brought with you!
  • Put on lots of layers. Haramaki, gloves, hat, thermals.
  • Sip a warm drink: this helps warm the body gently from the inside.
  • Eat something: sugar will help raise body temperature so have some cake!
  • Sit in a warm environment: chance for more tea and more cake with your fellow swimmers….
  • Walk around to generate body heat. It can take some time to warm properly. Running up and down the beach while waiting for your friends-who-faff can help.

For more information about acclimatising to cold water, the benefits and the risks go to the Outdoor Swimming Society 

If you have any good tips please add in the comments 🙂