Reducing plastic pollution…

We have all become more aware of the disaster that is plastic pollution. At NukuNuku we are always trying to reduce our carbon footprint and reduce waste. We use compostable mailers to send out our orders. We keep packaging to a minimum. We favour natural fibres such as cotton and wool over man-made as man made fibres are basically plastic and release micro-particles of plastic into the water every time they are washed adding to the problem of plastic pollution particularly marine pollution.

NukuNuku Haramaki do include lycra. Without it your haramaki would not be stretchy enough or keep its shape and last you a long time – leading to more waste! Which is not what we want. There is no alternative yet readily available or affordable (lycra made from recycled plastics for example?). Most of us cannot afford to choose only natural fibres on an everyday basis – it is just too difficult and too expensive – especially when buying for a family etc.

However, while we all try to limit our plastic use and waste where we can until the industry changes and offers viable alternatives These are fantastic inventions we  recommend for limiting your plastic pollution when washing your clothes – the guppy friend washing bag and the cora ball which will catch your micro-fibres as your clothes shed them in the wash.

CORA BALL
GUPPY FRIEND

We can also recycle or upcycle our clothes when they have given up the ghost – there are vouchers available to save you money in some shops if you take your used textiles in. They will be then reworn, recycled or reused as insulation or mattress stuffing for example.

What are your top tips for reducing waste and pollution?

Quality vs Quantity

At NukuNuku we took time developing our own brand haramaki. Trading ethically and limiting negative impact on the environment are key to our values. We are fully behind initiatives such as the Fashion Revolution – which ask the consumer to think deeply about “who made my clothes?” and our mantra is quality over quantity.

Sourcing closer to home allows you to check your supply chain and support your own local economy. It also reduces airmiles and therefore your carbon footprint.

Our haramaki belly-bands are made from cotton that is grown in the EU (and therefore regulated by EU labour and environment laws) then knitted, dyed and finished in Nottingham by a small but hugely experienced British company. It is of the highest quality. Quality is key as we do not want to sell a throw away item, but a durable product that you can wash and wear time and again. We hate waste! Reducing waste is something very close to our hearts (and there are some great tips here). Our haramaki are cut from our lovely soft cotton/lycra and sewn by a small family company with years of experience in jersey fabrics and high standards of quality control who we work closely with.

Our family and friends have been wearing NukuNuku own brand haramaki day in day out for years and they are still going strong. We have customer feedback that supports this and the durability of our ‘kidney warmers. Our aim is to have our customers return to NukuNuku and recommend us because our product is the best quality and lasts. We want 100% satisfaction!

We are proud to be #madeintheuk

 

Tips for warming up after sea swimming

“After drop” is common after swimming in cold water; you get out and feel fine, and then you start to get colder, sometimes growing faint, shivering violently and feeling unwell.” (Outdoor Swimming Society) 

Learning to head off the after drop is a key part of continuing to swim in cold water all year round. While in the cold water you can be lured into a false sense of security (numbness!) and stay in what turns out to be too long. With practice you learn your limitations (trial and error!)  just how cold you are going to be about 10 minutes after getting out. You then learn to moderate your swim times and get out before you feel you have to. Then the key is warming up – slowly. If you have a hot shower for example the blood can run from your core (where it is working hard to maintain your core temperature and keep you alive!) to your skin and actually make your temperature drop along with your blood pressure – potentially making you feel faint and ‘stinging’ your skin.

As you start to warm up blood starts to recirculate in your extremities and peripheral blood vessels, cooling as it travels. You can lose up to 4.5°C from your core temperature. This is where you haramaki corewarmer comes in really really handy.

swimmers in haramaki

Tips to warm up after you get out of cold water: 

  • Get dressed as soon as you can. Preferably starting with the top half of your body.  Use a haramaki. Use a robe to get dressed quicker and keep out of the wind.
  • Put on a hat and gloves and have some tea from a flask you brought with you!
  • Put on lots of layers. Haramaki, gloves, hat, thermals.
  • Sip a warm drink: this helps warm the body gently from the inside.
  • Eat something: sugar will help raise body temperature so have some cake!
  • Sit in a warm environment: chance for more tea and more cake with your fellow swimmers….
  • Walk around to generate body heat. It can take some time to warm properly. Running up and down the beach while waiting for your friends-who-faff can help.

For more information about acclimatising to cold water, the benefits and the risks go to the Outdoor Swimming Society 

If you have any good tips please add in the comments 🙂